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Employment In the United States

Employment In the United States
Planning to work in the united states? article will show you information about how to start, livelihood and the employment requirements in the us.
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EMPLOYMENT IN THE UNITED STATES

People in US work hard on their career, their success and the realization of their own dream. That dream exists for many people from a beautiful house, some prestige and sufficient means to allow their children to study at one of the renowned schools.

But how you start?
A specific visa isn't required for a short business trip to the United States. For a stay of up to 90 days you can use the Visa Waiver program. You can apply for this visa online.

If you want to work in the US for more than 90 days, you must apply for a work visa. Note that there are different visas and that each destination requires a different specific visa. The ESTA website can help you select the right visa. The most common visas are:
- Business trip: For a business trip that lasts longer than 90 days, apply for a B-1 or B-2 visa.
- Investment or trade: If you go to US with investment plans, you probably need an investment visa (E-2).
- Transfers: If you're going to US for a transfer (new job with your current employer) then the L-1 visa applies.
- Internship / Training: For an internship in US the J visa is applicable. The visa is also valid for young professionals who want to gain more practical experience in the US.
- US issues a limited number of visas annually. An approval on your application doesn't mean that you automatically receive a visa. The criteria for approval are unfortunately not all equally clear. What is certain is that your destination, your country of origin and the eventual duration of your stay are at least a factor. Eventually, an application can take a long time.

Although the costs aren't high, applying for a visa through the ESTA system isn't free of charge.

Livelihood in US
Since the financial crisis in general and the mortgage crisis in particular, It's therefore wise to start with a rental property. Such a property is generally reasonably affordable (of course strongly dependent on the location) and gives you the opportunity to look around and orientate yourself on the market.

If you're planning to buy a house, it's best to hire a real estate agent. The buying and selling of homes in US differs greatly from the way in which this happens in most countries.

Note: Don't buy a cat in a bag. People in US do everything to sell their house as well as possible. It's probably only recently painted, the stylist has everything neatly decorated and tidied and any minor defects may have been blurred.

Note: In some countries, the buyer pays any extra costs when purchasing a house (the so-called Buyer Cost), in US these costs are for the account of the selling party.

Applying for an employment in US
If you have entered US on a tourist visa, you aren't allowed to apply or accept a job. you'll first have to find a job from your country, then you have to arrange your visa and after that you can only travel. Incidentally, there are enough online job boards that you can use to look for a job.

If you want to work in US, 'networking' is very important. Vacancies are often first filled in by their own employees or personal contacts. Make your ambitions known to everyone you know or who has contacts with People in US or United States companies.

Keep in mind that you may have to fly to US for a job interview. Should such a conversation lead to a job, you'll have to go back to your country to arrange the right visa from there.

You can view an application in US as a conversation in which you have to sell yourself. you'll have to prove that you're the best choice for this specific job. Work experience is often more important than, for example, training. Prepare yourself for the interview, read in, immerse yourself in the company and know what you expect from the job. Go well dressed (rather overdressed) and be courteous.

Working in US
The labor market in US is much more flexible: people can be hired quickly, but they can also be dismissed just as quickly.
People in US work a lot and a long time, a working week of 50 hours isn't uncommon. The travel time is still outside. It can easily be an hour and a half back.

Most US companies have far few holidays and there are other rules around sickness. Inform yourself about this in advance so that you'll not be faced with surprises. An official day off in the weekend is compensated by a day off on the preceding Friday or the following Monday.

Helpful tips
- A LinkedIn profile with international contacts and recommendations makes you interesting for employers. If you're planning to apply, it's good to update your profile and collect some relevant recommendations. Of course you do everything in correct English!

- In US the term "CV" is never used, it's called a "Resume".



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Posted by: Amr ElKashef | Author:

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